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Scrumptious Seafood: Seared Scallops with Chorizo and Potatoes

A succulent combination of farmed off bottom scallops and chorizo make this recipe from the Monterey Bay Aquarium‘s Seafood Watch a foolproof best choice!

Ingredients

  • (Serves 6–8 as a soft taco filling or tapa)
  • 1 pound red-skin boiling potatoes (about 4 medium), cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • Salt
  • 1 pound scallops
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable or olive oil
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 12 ounces fresh Mexican chorizo sausage (about 1 1/2 cups), casing removed
  • 4 large green onions, roots and withered outer leaves trimmed off, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • Corn tortillas (optional)

Directions

For the potatoes:

Half fill a 4-quart saucepan with water, add 1 tablespoon of salt and bring to boil.Add potatoes and simmer over medium heat until tender, about 12 minutes. Drain.

For the scallops:

Pat scallops dry with paper towels. Heat a 12-inch skillet or griddle over medium-high heat. For best results, choose a skillet or griddle that is heavy and nonstick or well-seasoned cast iron.

Add oil and, when quite hot, add scallops in an uncrowded layer. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Sear, turning occasionally, until golden, about 2 minutes total. With high heat, the scallops will sear without overcooking.

Scoop onto a wide plate.

To finish and serve:

Place chorizo and green onions in skillet. Cook over medium heat, breaking up any clumps of chorizo, just until sausage has rendered its fat, 6–7 minutes.

Add drained potatoes and continue cooking, occasionally scraping up any sticky bits, until potatoes begin to look crusty-brown, about 15 minutes.

Meanwhile, cut the scallops into pieces that resemble the diced potatoes.

When the potatoes are browned, add scallops. Mix everything together as the scallops heat for a minute or so.

Scoop the mixture into a serving bowl and set before guests. For tacos, serve with corn tortillas.

Happy Earth Day!

Kuterra salmon.

Today marks Earth Day and, interestingly, also the day that KUTERRA land-based farmed Atlantic salmon hits the market. KUTERRA LP is owned  by the ‘Namgis First Nation and based in Port McNeill. Their aim is to offer a sustainable option to conventionally farmed salmon. The salmon is being marketed by Richmond’s Albion Fisheries and sold at Safeway stores in BC and Alberta. Read more here.

Have you seen the Easter Salmon?

 

2011Easter Salmon 001Come to the Cannery Friday, Saturday or Sunday this weekend for scavenger hunt fun and a chance to glimpse the elusive Easter Salmon in its natural habitat! No ordinary fish, the Easter Salmon lays chocolate and candy eggs in the spring, quite unlike regular salmon, who spawn in the fall. Keep in mind that this a rare species who likes to hide amongst exhibits and employ pastel camouflage. Take note: Easter Salmon may think much of carrots but is rather fond of krill!

A pint of kelp, please!

Nope, not kidding. Tofino Brewing Co. actually brews a Kelp Stout with locally harvested seaweed. Apparently, it’s a full-bodied ale with “a unique, umami-type quality” that adds to its complexity. For a full tasting review, make sure to check out this review in Edible Vancouver magazine. Does it get any more West Coast than this?

Scrumptious Seafood: Smoked Salmon Deviled Eggs

Just in case dyed eggs aren’t your thing for the upcoming Easter weekend, there’s a more grown up alternative in these delectable deviled eggs. Brought to you by Fine Cooking - the Easter Bunny’s got enough on his plate!

  • 6 large hard-cooked eggs
  • 4 oz. cold-smoked salmon, very finely diced (about 1/2 cup)
  • 1/4 cup thinly sliced fresh chives
  • 1/4 cup mayonnaise
  • 2 Tbs. minced red onion
  • 2 Tbs. capers, rinsed and finely chopped
  • 1 Tbs. fresh lemon juice
  • 1/2 tsp. packed finely grated lemon zest
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Peel and halve the eggs lengthwise. Remove the yolks and crumble them into a medium bowl. Add the salmon, 3 Tbs. of the chives, the mayonnaise, onion, capers, lemon juice, zest, and 1/8 tsp. pepper and mix. Mound the filling into the egg whites. Garnish with the remaining 1 Tbs. chives and several grinds of black pepper.

Scrumptious Seafood: DIY Gravlax

AKA cured salmon, to those who aren’t Scandinavian fishermen by trade. Voila a delicious guide to making this brunch treat in the (soon to be fishy) comfort of your own home, courtesy of Edible Vancouver. Read more about the medieval origins of the name here.

  • 1 1/2 to 2 lb (700g to 1kg) wild salmon fillet, skin on
  • 1 cup (250mL) granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup (125mL) salt
  • 1/2 Tbsp (8mL) freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 1/2 large bunches fresh dill, chopped

Cut the fillet into two pieces and remove the pin bones (pressing down with your fingers to locate them, then using tweezers if necessary). In a small bowl, mix the sugar, salt, pepper, and dill. In a dish (large enough to hold the two pieces of fish stacked one on top of the other), spread 1/4 of the sugar mixture. Lay the first piece of fish over it, skin side down. Cover the flesh side well with half of the remaining mixture. Spread what remains of the cure over the flesh side of the second piece of fish, and lay this, skin side up, on top of the first piece. You’ll have what looks like a salmon sandwich with the sugar-salt cure as filling. Cover with plastic wrap and weigh down with pebbles or cans. Leave unrefrigerated for six hours so the cure melts into the fish flesh (unless you’re doing this during a heat wave or your home is very warm, in which case it would be safest to put the fish straight into the fridge.)

The fish will be cured after 24 hours, but more flavourful after 2 days. Unwrap the fish and rinse away the cure. Dry well and slice thinly on the bias (at a 45-degree angle to the skin). Discard the skin (somewhere near a cat).

Thank you, Cannery volunteers!

‘Volunteering is the ultimate exercise in democracy.  You vote in elections once a year, but when you volunteer, you vote every day about the kind of community you want to live in.’        -Marjorie Moore

April 6th-12th is National Volunteer Week and the perfect time to say how much we appreciate everything our dedicated team . . . → Read More: Thank you, Cannery volunteers!

What Am I? The Iron Butcher!

Full Iron butcher resized

After a short hiatus for spring break, the answer to the previous mystery is: the Iron Butcher!

So what did this death-defying steampunk-esque machine of grinding gears and spinning blades do? It removed the parts of the salmon that you don’t (usually) want to munch on – the guts, fins, tail, and head.  The . . . → Read More: What Am I? The Iron Butcher!

Join us for Easter at the Cannery!

2014 Easter jpeg

Join us for our annual Easter Scavenger Hunt! This year, our hunt has been extended over three days and will take place all day Good Friday through to Easter Sunday. If you’re lucky, you might catch a glimpse of the Easter Salmon scurrying by! Included with regular admission to the site.

. . . → Read More: Join us for Easter at the Cannery!

The babies are swimming!

salmonids 002 - blog

The baby salmon, that is. They’re actually called fry, but as you may have guessed, we’re rather attached to them. Now that they’ve fully hatched, we’re able to keep the doors of their ‘cradle’ open throughout the day.  When they make the big journey up to the top of the tank to take . . . → Read More: The babies are swimming!